DSM-5 – What are Hallucinations?

By | DSM-5

DSM-5 - What are Hallucinations?

Published on 7th August 2018
Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
489

Joseph de Saram discusses Hallucinations, perceptions in the absence of external stimulus that has qualities of real perception. Hallucinations are vivid, substantial, and are perceiv+ed to be located in external objective space. They are distinguishable from several related phenomena, such as dreaming, which does not involve wakefulness; pseudohallucination, which does not mimic real perception, and is accurately perceived as unreal; illusion, which involv4es distorted or misinterpreted real perception; and imagery, which does not mimic real perception and is under voluntary control.[1]

“Hallucinations are perception-like experiences that occur without an external stimulus. They are vivid and clear, with the full force and impact of normal perceptions, and not under voluntary control. They may occur in any sensory modality, but auditory hallucinations are the most common in schizophrenia and related disorders.” – DSM-5

* * OBVIOUSLY IT IS NOT A HALLUCINATION IF THERE IS VOLUMINOUS FORENSIC EVIDENCE RELATING TO THE 12/17 FRAUD, WHICH CAN BE ANALYSED 650 DAYS AFTERWARDS 🙂 * *

Medical Definition of Hallucination

Hallucination: A profound distortion in a person’s perception of reality, typically accompanied by a powerful sense of reality. An hallucination may be a sensory experience in which a person can see, hear, smell, taste, or feel something that is not there.

The types of hallucinations include:

  • An Auditory hallucination is an hallucination involving the sense of hearing. Called also paracusia and paracusis.
  • A Gustatory hallucination is an hallucination involving the sense of taste.
  • A hypnagogic hallucination is a vivid dreamlike hallucination at the onset of sleep.
  • Kinesthetic hallucination is an hallucination involving the sense of bodily movement.
  • Lilliputian hallucination is an hallucination in which things, people, or animals seem smaller than they would be in reality.
  • Olfactory hallucination is an hallucination involving the sense of smell.
  • Somatic hallucination is an hallucination involving the perception of a physical experience occurring with the body.
  • Tactile hallucination is an hallucination involving the sense of touch.
  • Visual hallucination is an hallucination involving the sense of sight.

What Are Hallucinations?

If you're like most folks, you probably think hallucinations have to do with seeing things that aren't really there. But there's a lot more to it than that. It could mean you touch or even smell something that doesn't exist ...

Text

Edward de Saram has a History of Drug-Induced Hallucination

Drug-Induced Formication: How it Happens and How to Make it Stop Formication is the sensation as if something is crawling in your skin. Believe it or not, it is a common phenomenon for many people who use stimulant drugs. How does it happen? Is there a way to prevent it? This article highlights what drug-induced formication is and how to make it stop ...

Text

Drug-Induced Psychosis - 25i-NBOMe as used in Political Psychiatry

As I have recovered more forensic evidence I have been able to make a number of enhancements to previous theories ...

Text

Substance-Induced Mental Disorders

As I wrote in the following article, Edward de Saram obtained and poisoned me with psychotropic medication that ‘conveniently’ fabricated schizophrenia-type symptoms ...

Text

Drug-Induced Formication

Drug-Induced Formication: How it Happens and How to Make it Stop Formication is the sensation as if something is crawling in your skin. Believe it or not, it is a common phenomenon for many people who use stimulant drugs. How does it happen? Is there a way to prevent it? This article highlights what drug-induced formication is and how to make it stop ...

“Auditory hallucinations are usually experienced as voices, whether familiar or unfamiliar, that are perceived as distinct from the individual’s own thoughts. The hallucinations must occur in the context of a clear sensorium; those that occur while falling asleep (hypnagogic) or waking up (hypnopompic) are considered to be within the range of normal experience. Hallucinations may be a normal part of religious experience in certain cultural contexts.” – DSM-5

Auditory and Visual Hallucinations - Definitely Schizophrenia

Auditory ‘Hallucinations’ according to EDS The Fraud Psychiatrist The ‘hallucinations’ are actually forensic evidence which confirms cellular interception, UK News of the World Style 🙂 ...

Text

Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
RHODIUM GROUP

DSM-5 – What is Grossly Disorganized or Abnormal Motor Behavior (including Catatonia)?

By | DSM-5

DSM-5 - What is Grossly Disorganized or Abnormal Motor Behavior (including Catatonia)?

Published on 7th August 2018
Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
348

Enter more text here

Grossly Disorganized or Abnormal Motor Behavior (including Catatonia)

Grossly disorganized or abnormal motor behavior may manifest itself in a variety of ways, ranging from childlike “silliness” to unpredictable agitation. Problems may be noted in any form of goal-directed behavior, leading to difficulties in performing activities of daily living.

Catatonic behavior is a marked decrease in reactivity to the environment. This ranges from resistance to instructions {negativism); to maintaining a rigid, inappropriate or bizarre posture; to a complete lack of verbal and motor responses {mutism and stupor). It can also include purposeless and excessive motor activity without obvious cause {catatonic excitement). Other features are repeated stereotyped movements, staring, grimacing, mutism, and the echoing of speech. Although catatonia has historically been associated with schizophrenia, catatonic symptoms are nonspecific and may occur in other mental disorders (e.g., bipolar or depressive disorders with catatonia) and in medical conditions
(catatonic disorder due to another medical condition).

Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
RHODIUM GROUP

DSM-5 – What are Negative Symptoms?

By | DSM-5

DSM-5 - What are Negative Symptoms?

Published on 7th August 2018
Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
351

Enter more text here

Negative Symptoms

Negative symptoms account for a substantial portion of the morbidity associated with schizophrenia but are less prominent in other psychotic disorders. Two negative symptoms are particularly prominent in schizophrenia: diminished emotional expression and avolition. Diminished emotional expression includes reductions in the expression of emotions in the face, eye contact, intonation of speech (prosody), and movements of the hand, head, and face that normally give an emotional emphasis to speech. Avolition is a decrease in motivated self-initiated purposeful activities. The individual may sit for long periods of time and show little interest in participating in work or social activities. Other negative symptoms include alogia, anhedonia, and asociality. Alogia is manifested by diminished speech output. Anhedonia is the decreased ability to experience pleasure from positive stimuli or a degradation in the recollection of pleasure previously experienced. Asociality refers to the apparent lack of interest in social interactions and may be associated with avolition, but it can also be a manifestation of limited opportunities for social interactions.

Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
RHODIUM GROUP

DSM-5 – What is Disorganized Thinking (Speech)?

By | DSM-5

DSM-5 – What Is Disorganized Thinking (Speech)?

Published on 7th August 2018
Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
398

Joseph de Saram discusses Thought disorder (TD) refering to disorganized thinking, as evidenced by disorganized speech. Specific thought disorders include derailment, poverty of speech, tangentiality, illogicality, perseveration, and thought blocking. Psychiatrists consider formal thought disorder as being one of two types of disordered thinking, with the other type being delusions. The latter involves “content” while the former involves “form“. Although the term “thought disorder” can refer to either type, in common parlance it refers most often to a disorder of thought “form” also known as formal thought disorder.

“Disorganised thinking (formal thought disorder) is typically inferred from the individual’s speech. The individual may switch from one topic to another {derailment or loose associations).

Answers to questions may be obliquely related or completely unrelated (tangentiality). Rarely, speech may be so severely disorganized that it is nearly incomprehensible and resembles receptive aphasia in its linguistic disorganization {incoherence or “word salad”).” – DSM-5

“Because mildly disorganised speech is common and nonspecific, the symptom must be severe enough to substantially impair effective communication. The severity of the impairment may be difficult to evaluate if the person making the diagnosis comes from a different linguistic background than that of the person being examined.

Less severe disorganized thinking or speech may occur during the prodromal and residual periods of schizophrenia.” – DSM-5

Text

Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
RHODIUM GROUP

DSM-5 – What are Delusions?

By | DSM-5

DSM-5 – What are Delusions?

Published on 7th August 2018
Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
439

Joseph de Saram discusses Delusions, firm and fixed beliefs based on inadequate grounds not amenable to rational argument or evidence to contrary, not in sync with regional, cultural and educational background. As a pathology, it is distinct from a belief based on false or incomplete information, confabulationdogmaillusion, or some other misleading effects of perception. They have been found to occur in the context of many pathological states (both general physical and mental) and are of particular diagnostic importance in psychotic disorders including schizophreniaparaphreniamanicepisodes of bipolar disorder, and psychotic depression.

“Delusions are fixed beliefs that are not amenable to change in light of conflicting evidence. Their content may include a variety of themes (e.g., persecutory, referential, somatic, religious, grandiose).” – DSM-5 

“Persecutory delusions (i.e., belief that one is going to be harmed, harassed, and so forth by an individual, organization, or other group) are most common.” – DSM-5

Paranoid Persecutory Delusions' Label in Military Intelligence Operations - the Martha Mitchell Effect

The reason that I have done so is because the three concepts above constitute an ‘Unholy Trinity’ which is not immediately obvious to the folks without experience of how the Defence industry actually works. NOTWITHSTANDING THE FACT THAT MY ‘ADVENTURES’ CONTINUALLY DEMONSTRATE A PHENOMENAL LEVEL ...

Evidence of Military Intelligence Operation was Destroyed via Psychiatric Fraud

Using psychiatric diagnosis, treatment or detention for political purposes has been widely alleged all over the world during the twentieth century. Joseph de Saram, whose background is in military intelligence / law enforcement forensics was therefore able to easily identify the perpetrators running various frauds and criminal intimidation against him…....

“Referential delusions (i.e., belief that certain gestures, comments, environmental cues, and so forth are directed at oneself) are also common. Grandiose delusions (i.e., when an individual believes that he or she has exceptional abilities, wealth, or fame) and érotomanie delusions (i.e., when an individual believes falsely that another person is in love with him or her) are also seen.

Nihilistic delusions involve the conviction that a major catastrophe will occur, and somatic delusions focus on preoccupations regarding health and organ function. Delusions are deemed bizarre if they are clearly implausible and not understandable to same-culture peers and do not derive from ordinary life experiences.

An example of a Bizarre delusion is the belief that an outside force has removed his or her internal organs and replaced them with someone else’s organs without leaving any wounds or scars.” – DSM-5

“An example of a Non-bizarre delusion is the belief that one is under surveillance by the police, despite a lack of convincing evidence.” – DSM-5

Surveillance | Exposed

The most comprehensive account yet assembled of the human rights abuses associated with CIA secret detention and extraordinary rendition operations....

text

Technical Surveillance Counter-Measures using WAM-108t

Joseph de Saram‘s ‘weapon of choice’ is the JJN Digital WAM-108t, designed to detect and locate transmissions from all types of Radio Frequency devices. The WAM-108t contains an unprecedented eight separate RF detectors operating simultaneously to give complete RF coverage: 1 x 0-14 GHz Wideband, 5 x Cellular 2G/3G/4G and 2 x Wifi/Bluetooth 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz ....

text

Military Operation Game - Genius Joe's Surveillance Pyramid

Joseph de Saram analyses and expands upon the signature identifiers in military intelligence / law enforcement operations, drawing from actual mission data relating to clandestine, covert, overt and harassment surveillance ...

text

A Bug's Life in Police Surveillance

[An interesting article for those Linkies who work at the Independent Police Complaints Commisson, South Yorkshire Police and the Crown Prosecution Service] Empowered Individuals First and foremost, because of my [previous] unusual work, it is extremely easy for me to end up on watch lists and as a threat to national security. The only thing that changes is the type and reason for the surveillance and the authorisations that ....

Exposing Covert Surveillance via the Existence of Triangulation

IMSI Catchers Used In Concert to Locate the Target’s Position Notwithstanding the hundreds of videos that I have of actors farting around with bikes and rucksacks, this article confirms via forensic evidence that I WAS ACTUALLY BEING FOLLOWED – READ ON… ...

text

How 'Neighbours Acting' Exposed Another CHIS

On 28 and 29 November 2015 Raymond Michael Callingham of Beeley Hawley & Co, along with his co-worker Kim Worrall came to see me in order to provide a full accounting and book-keeping service. By way of information I had known Callingham since around 1996 and from memory they provided audited accounts for the original Rhodium PLC in the UK, for the years 1997 and 1998 ...

“Delusions that express a loss of control over mind or body are generally considered to be bizarre; these include the belief that one’s thoughts have been “removed” by some outside force {thought withdrawal), that alien thoughts have been put into one’s mind (thought insertion), or that one’s body or actions are being acted on or manipulated by some outside force (delusions of control).

The distinction between a delusion and a strongly held idea is sometimes difficult to make and depends in part on the degree of conviction with which the belief is held despite clear or reasonable contradictory evidence regarding its veracity.” – DSM-5

Text

Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
RHODIUM GROUP