Methylphenidate-Induced Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome: A Case Report

By | GBH - DRUG INDUCED PSYCHOSIS
Methylphenidate-Induced-Neuroleptic-Malignant-Syndrome-A-Case-Report

Methylphenidate-Induced Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome: A Case Report

Die Hard – My Erection Saved My Life (±x)
Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
556

Joseph de Saram discusses Hiccups, which can arise from idiopathic, psychogenic and organic causes. The use of therapeutic drugs forms one of the important causes of hiccups. Although the exact pathophysiological processes involved have not yet been established, the neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin and gamma amino butyric aid (GABA) have been documented to play a significant role in the generation of hiccups. Reported herein, a patient of organic bipolar affective disorder who developed hiccups with the atypical antipsychotic aripiprazole. The possible underlying neurotransmitter mechanisms, predisposing factors and clinical implications of this rare adverse event are discussed.

Anti-psychotics and Hiccups

‘Persistent hiccups’ refers to hiccups that continue for more than 48 hours. A number of medical conditions, including idiopathic, psychogenic, and organic causes as well as medications, are known to cause persistent and intractable hiccups. Among the medications reported to induce hiccups, corticosteroids and benzodiazepines are the drug classes most frequently associated with the development of hiccups.

Antipsychotic-induced hiccups have rarely been reported in the literature, and to the best of our knowledge, only 8 cases of aripiprazole-induced hiccups have been reported in the literature. Here, an additional case of aripiprazole-induced persistent hiccups is reported with a review of previously reported cases.

A 35-year-old married male patient was brought by his wife to an outpatient clinic in February 2014 for experiencing auditory hallucinations, delusions of being cheated by his wife, and crying without a reason. Mental status examination revealed a normal rate and amount of speech, depressive mood, anxious affect, poor concentration, auditory hallucinations, reference and persecutory delusions, and decreased sleep and appetites.

All the routine investigations including hemogram and liver, kidney, and thyroid function tests were within normal limits. The patient was diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) with psychotic features according to the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, and venlafaxine 75 mg/day and aripiprazole 10 mg/day were initiated at the same time. Within 24 hours of taking his medications, the patient started having hiccups continuously.

A detailed history and physical examination of the patient did not reveal any signs or symptoms of underlying physical illness. The patient consulted an internist, who after preliminary examination advised to add pantoprazole 40 mg two times daily empirically. Hiccups did not resolve despite a 3-day course of pantoprazole treatment. In order to eliminate underlying possible drug induced adverse effect, we made a decision, based on a literature review, to stop aripiprazole instead of venlafaxine, as there have been eight cases of aripiprazole-induced hiccups reported in the l i terature, whereas no relationship was reported with venlafaxine.

Aripiprazole was discontinued on day 5; hiccups disappeared approximately 36 hours after the last dose of aripiprazole. Aripiprazole rechallenge was planned but the patient did not give consent for rechallenge; therefore, the drug was replaced with olanzapine. The patient was maintaining well on a follow-up one month later.

Hiccups are often associated with gastric distension, sudden changes in temperature and emotion, ingestion of alcohol; they usually resolve spontaneously or with simple measures such as breath holding and rarely necessitate medication. Hiccups continuing longer than 24 hours are rare and may indicate serious underlying diseases. Organic causes should be excluded with adequate evaluation based on history, physical examination, and selected DOI: 10.5455/bcp.20150212035451

Methylphenidate-Induced Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome: A Case Report

‘Persistent hiccups’ refers to hiccups that continue for more than 48 hours. A number of medical conditions, including idiopathic, psychogenic, and organic causes as well as medications, are known to cause persistent and intractable hiccups.

Text

Symptoms

Text

Aripiprazole induced hiccups

Rania Kattura, PharmD, MS, BCPP1 and Prakeh Shet, MD, MBA2 1 Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy, Austin, TX 2 Psychiatrist, Mexia State Supported Living Center

Hiccups Associated With Switching From Olanzapine to Aripiprazole in a Patient With Paranoid Schizophrenia

This article reports the case of a 29-year-old schizophrenic woman without somatic illness in whom switching from olanzapine to aripiprazole induced hiccups. Antipsychotics are thought to be effective in the treatment of hiccups; however, they have rarely been reported to induce hiccups.

Text

Sudden Cardiac Arrest caused by Olanzapine (Zyprexa)

This article reports the case of a 29-year-old schizophrenic woman without somatic illness in whom switching from olanzapine to aripiprazole induced hiccups. Antipsychotics are thought to be effective in the treatment of hiccups;

Hiccup due to aripiprazole plus methylphenidate treatment in an adolescent with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder: A case report.

Our case had hiccups arising in an adolescent with the attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder (CD) after adding aripiprazole treatment to extended-release methylphenidate.

Text

The case continues…

Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
RHODIUM GROUP

What is Serotonin Syndrome?

By | GBH - DRUG INDUCED PSYCHOSIS
What-is-Serotonin-Syndrome

What is Serotonin Syndrome?

Die Hard – My Erection Saved My Life (±x)
Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
532

Joseph de Saram discusses Hiccups, which can arise from idiopathic, psychogenic and organic causes. The use of therapeutic drugs forms one of the important causes of hiccups. Although the exact pathophysiological processes involved have not yet been established, the neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin and gamma amino butyric aid (GABA) have been documented to play a significant role in the generation of hiccups. Reported herein, a patient of organic bipolar affective disorder who developed hiccups with the atypical antipsychotic aripiprazole. The possible underlying neurotransmitter mechanisms, predisposing factors and clinical implications of this rare adverse event are discussed.

Anti-psychotics and Hiccups

‘Persistent hiccups’ refers to hiccups that continue for more than 48 hours. A number of medical conditions, including idiopathic, psychogenic, and organic causes as well as medications, are known to cause persistent and intractable hiccups. Among the medications reported to induce hiccups, corticosteroids and benzodiazepines are the drug classes most frequently associated with the development of hiccups.

Antipsychotic-induced hiccups have rarely been reported in the literature, and to the best of our knowledge, only 8 cases of aripiprazole-induced hiccups have been reported in the literature. Here, an additional case of aripiprazole-induced persistent hiccups is reported with a review of previously reported cases.

A 35-year-old married male patient was brought by his wife to an outpatient clinic in February 2014 for experiencing auditory hallucinations, delusions of being cheated by his wife, and crying without a reason. Mental status examination revealed a normal rate and amount of speech, depressive mood, anxious affect, poor concentration, auditory hallucinations, reference and persecutory delusions, and decreased sleep and appetites.

All the routine investigations including hemogram and liver, kidney, and thyroid function tests were within normal limits. The patient was diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) with psychotic features according to the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, and venlafaxine 75 mg/day and aripiprazole 10 mg/day were initiated at the same time. Within 24 hours of taking his medications, the patient started having hiccups continuously.

A detailed history and physical examination of the patient did not reveal any signs or symptoms of underlying physical illness. The patient consulted an internist, who after preliminary examination advised to add pantoprazole 40 mg two times daily empirically. Hiccups did not resolve despite a 3-day course of pantoprazole treatment. In order to eliminate underlying possible drug induced adverse effect, we made a decision, based on a literature review, to stop aripiprazole instead of venlafaxine, as there have been eight cases of aripiprazole-induced hiccups reported in the l i terature, whereas no relationship was reported with venlafaxine.

Aripiprazole was discontinued on day 5; hiccups disappeared approximately 36 hours after the last dose of aripiprazole. Aripiprazole rechallenge was planned but the patient did not give consent for rechallenge; therefore, the drug was replaced with olanzapine. The patient was maintaining well on a follow-up one month later.

Hiccups are often associated with gastric distension, sudden changes in temperature and emotion, ingestion of alcohol; they usually resolve spontaneously or with simple measures such as breath holding and rarely necessitate medication. Hiccups continuing longer than 24 hours are rare and may indicate serious underlying diseases. Organic causes should be excluded with adequate evaluation based on history, physical examination, and selected DOI: 10.5455/bcp.20150212035451

Aripiprazole-Induced Persistent Hiccups

‘Persistent hiccups’ refers to hiccups that continue for more than 48 hours. A number of medical conditions, including idiopathic, psychogenic, and organic causes as well as medications, are known to cause persistent and intractable hiccups.

Text

Symptoms

Text

Aripiprazole induced hiccups

Rania Kattura, PharmD, MS, BCPP1 and Prakeh Shet, MD, MBA2 1 Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy, Austin, TX 2 Psychiatrist, Mexia State Supported Living Center

Hiccups Associated With Switching From Olanzapine to Aripiprazole in a Patient With Paranoid Schizophrenia

This article reports the case of a 29-year-old schizophrenic woman without somatic illness in whom switching from olanzapine to aripiprazole induced hiccups. Antipsychotics are thought to be effective in the treatment of hiccups; however, they have rarely been reported to induce hiccups.

Text

Sudden Cardiac Arrest caused by Olanzapine (Zyprexa)

This article reports the case of a 29-year-old schizophrenic woman without somatic illness in whom switching from olanzapine to aripiprazole induced hiccups. Antipsychotics are thought to be effective in the treatment of hiccups;

Hiccup due to aripiprazole plus methylphenidate treatment in an adolescent with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder: A case report.

Our case had hiccups arising in an adolescent with the attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder (CD) after adding aripiprazole treatment to extended-release methylphenidate.

Text

The case continues…

Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
RHODIUM GROUP

What is Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome?

By | GBH - DRUG INDUCED PSYCHOSIS
What-is-Neuroleptic-Malignant-Syndrome

What is Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome?

Die Hard – My Erection Saved My Life (±x)
Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
535

Joseph de Saram discusses Hiccups, which can arise from idiopathic, psychogenic and organic causes. The use of therapeutic drugs forms one of the important causes of hiccups. Although the exact pathophysiological processes involved have not yet been established, the neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin and gamma amino butyric aid (GABA) have been documented to play a significant role in the generation of hiccups. Reported herein, a patient of organic bipolar affective disorder who developed hiccups with the atypical antipsychotic aripiprazole. The possible underlying neurotransmitter mechanisms, predisposing factors and clinical implications of this rare adverse event are discussed.

Anti-psychotics and Hiccups

‘Persistent hiccups’ refers to hiccups that continue for more than 48 hours. A number of medical conditions, including idiopathic, psychogenic, and organic causes as well as medications, are known to cause persistent and intractable hiccups. Among the medications reported to induce hiccups, corticosteroids and benzodiazepines are the drug classes most frequently associated with the development of hiccups.

Antipsychotic-induced hiccups have rarely been reported in the literature, and to the best of our knowledge, only 8 cases of aripiprazole-induced hiccups have been reported in the literature. Here, an additional case of aripiprazole-induced persistent hiccups is reported with a review of previously reported cases.

A 35-year-old married male patient was brought by his wife to an outpatient clinic in February 2014 for experiencing auditory hallucinations, delusions of being cheated by his wife, and crying without a reason. Mental status examination revealed a normal rate and amount of speech, depressive mood, anxious affect, poor concentration, auditory hallucinations, reference and persecutory delusions, and decreased sleep and appetites.

All the routine investigations including hemogram and liver, kidney, and thyroid function tests were within normal limits. The patient was diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) with psychotic features according to the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, and venlafaxine 75 mg/day and aripiprazole 10 mg/day were initiated at the same time. Within 24 hours of taking his medications, the patient started having hiccups continuously.

A detailed history and physical examination of the patient did not reveal any signs or symptoms of underlying physical illness. The patient consulted an internist, who after preliminary examination advised to add pantoprazole 40 mg two times daily empirically. Hiccups did not resolve despite a 3-day course of pantoprazole treatment. In order to eliminate underlying possible drug induced adverse effect, we made a decision, based on a literature review, to stop aripiprazole instead of venlafaxine, as there have been eight cases of aripiprazole-induced hiccups reported in the l i terature, whereas no relationship was reported with venlafaxine.

Aripiprazole was discontinued on day 5; hiccups disappeared approximately 36 hours after the last dose of aripiprazole. Aripiprazole rechallenge was planned but the patient did not give consent for rechallenge; therefore, the drug was replaced with olanzapine. The patient was maintaining well on a follow-up one month later.

Hiccups are often associated with gastric distension, sudden changes in temperature and emotion, ingestion of alcohol; they usually resolve spontaneously or with simple measures such as breath holding and rarely necessitate medication. Hiccups continuing longer than 24 hours are rare and may indicate serious underlying diseases. Organic causes should be excluded with adequate evaluation based on history, physical examination, and selected DOI: 10.5455/bcp.20150212035451

What Is Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome?

Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare reaction to antipsychotic drugs that treat schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other mental health conditions. It affects the nervous system and causes symptoms like a high fever and muscle stiffness.

The case continues…

Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
RHODIUM GROUP

Aripiprazole-induced Psychosis Confirmed by Hiccups

By | GBH - DRUG INDUCED PSYCHOSIS
Aripiprazole-induced-Psychosis-Confirmed-by-Hiccups

Aripiprazole-induced Psychosis Confirmed by Hiccups

Die Hard – My Erection Saved My Life (±x)
Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
353

Joseph de Saram discusses Hiccups, which can arise from idiopathic, psychogenic and organic causes. The use of therapeutic drugs forms one of the important causes of hiccups. Although the exact pathophysiological processes involved have not yet been established, the neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin and gamma amino butyric aid (GABA) have been documented to play a significant role in the generation of hiccups. Reported herein, a patient of organic bipolar affective disorder who developed hiccups with the atypical antipsychotic aripiprazole. The possible underlying neurotransmitter mechanisms, predisposing factors and clinical implications of this rare adverse event are discussed.

Anti-psychotics and Hiccups

‘Persistent hiccups’ refers to hiccups that continue for more than 48 hours. A number of medical conditions, including idiopathic, psychogenic, and organic causes as well as medications, are known to cause persistent and intractable hiccups. Among the medications reported to induce hiccups, corticosteroids and benzodiazepines are the drug classes most frequently associated with the development of hiccups.

Antipsychotic-induced hiccups have rarely been reported in the literature, and to the best of our knowledge, only 8 cases of aripiprazole-induced hiccups have been reported in the literature. Here, an additional case of aripiprazole-induced persistent hiccups is reported with a review of previously reported cases.

A 35-year-old married male patient was brought by his wife to an outpatient clinic in February 2014 for experiencing auditory hallucinations, delusions of being cheated by his wife, and crying without a reason. Mental status examination revealed a normal rate and amount of speech, depressive mood, anxious affect, poor concentration, auditory hallucinations, reference and persecutory delusions, and decreased sleep and appetites.

All the routine investigations including hemogram and liver, kidney, and thyroid function tests were within normal limits. The patient was diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) with psychotic features according to the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, and venlafaxine 75 mg/day and aripiprazole 10 mg/day were initiated at the same time. Within 24 hours of taking his medications, the patient started having hiccups continuously.

A detailed history and physical examination of the patient did not reveal any signs or symptoms of underlying physical illness. The patient consulted an internist, who after preliminary examination advised to add pantoprazole 40 mg two times daily empirically. Hiccups did not resolve despite a 3-day course of pantoprazole treatment. In order to eliminate underlying possible drug induced adverse effect, we made a decision, based on a literature review, to stop aripiprazole instead of venlafaxine, as there have been eight cases of aripiprazole-induced hiccups reported in the l i terature, whereas no relationship was reported with venlafaxine.

Aripiprazole was discontinued on day 5; hiccups disappeared approximately 36 hours after the last dose of aripiprazole. Aripiprazole rechallenge was planned but the patient did not give consent for rechallenge; therefore, the drug was replaced with olanzapine. The patient was maintaining well on a follow-up one month later.

Hiccups are often associated with gastric distension, sudden changes in temperature and emotion, ingestion of alcohol; they usually resolve spontaneously or with simple measures such as breath holding and rarely necessitate medication. Hiccups continuing longer than 24 hours are rare and may indicate serious underlying diseases. Organic causes should be excluded with adequate evaluation based on history, physical examination, and selected DOI: 10.5455/bcp.20150212035451

Aripiprazole-Induced Persistent Hiccups

‘Persistent hiccups’ refers to hiccups that continue for more than 48 hours. A number of medical conditions, including idiopathic, psychogenic, and organic causes as well as medications, are known to cause persistent and intractable hiccups.

Text

Symptoms

Text

Aripiprazole induced hiccups

Rania Kattura, PharmD, MS, BCPP1 and Prakeh Shet, MD, MBA2 1 Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy, Austin, TX 2 Psychiatrist, Mexia State Supported Living Center

Hiccups Associated With Switching From Olanzapine to Aripiprazole in a Patient With Paranoid Schizophrenia

This article reports the case of a 29-year-old schizophrenic woman without somatic illness in whom switching from olanzapine to aripiprazole induced hiccups. Antipsychotics are thought to be effective in the treatment of hiccups; however, they have rarely been reported to induce hiccups.

Text

Sudden Cardiac Arrest caused by Olanzapine (Zyprexa)

This article reports the case of a 29-year-old schizophrenic woman without somatic illness in whom switching from olanzapine to aripiprazole induced hiccups. Antipsychotics are thought to be effective in the treatment of hiccups;

Hiccup due to aripiprazole plus methylphenidate treatment in an adolescent with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder: A case report.

Our case had hiccups arising in an adolescent with the attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder (CD) after adding aripiprazole treatment to extended-release methylphenidate.

Text

The case continues…

Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
RHODIUM GROUP

Edward de Saram has a History of Drug-Induced Hallucination

By | GBH - DRUG INDUCED PSYCHOSIS
Edward-de-Saram-has-a-History-of-Drug-Induced-Hallucination

Edward de Saram has a History of Drug-Induced Hallucination

Published on 4th December 2017
Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
641

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Globalizing Torture: CIA Secret Detention and Extraordinary Rendition

The most comprehensive account yet assembled of the human rights abuses associated with CIA secret detention and extraordinary rendition operations....

Globalizing Torture: CIA Secret Detention and Extraordinary Rendition

The most comprehensive account yet assembled of the human rights abuses associated with CIA secret detention and extraordinary rendition operations....

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Globalizing Torture: CIA Secret Detention and Extraordinary Rendition

The most comprehensive account yet assembled of the human rights abuses associated with CIA secret detention and extraordinary rendition operations....

Title

Text

Title

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Globalizing Torture: CIA Secret Detention and Extraordinary Rendition

The most comprehensive account yet assembled of the human rights abuses associated with CIA secret detention and extraordinary rendition operations....

Title

Text

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Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
RHODIUM GROUP

Substance-Induced Mental Disorders

By | GBH - DRUG INDUCED PSYCHOSIS
substance-induced-mental-disorders-joseph-de-saram-rhodium-linkedin

Substance-Induced Mental Disorders (±x)

Published on 27th September 2017
Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
623

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Background

As I wrote in the following article, Edward de Saram obtained and poisoned me with psychotropic medication that ‘conveniently’ fabricated schizophrenia-type symptoms.

EDS then used the symptoms that he had falsified describing that which he wanted to third parties and manipulated them to do his bidding….

“The toxic effects of substances can mimic mental illness in ways that can be difficult to distinguish from mental illness.

This article focuses on symptoms of mental illness that are the result of substance abuse—a condition referred to as “substance-induced mental disorders.”

Overview

  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Cocaine and Amphetamines
  • Hallucinogens
  • Nicotine
  • Opioids
  • Sedatives

Description

As defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, Text Revision (American Psychiatric Association [APA] 2000) (DSM-IV-TR), substance-induced disorders include:

  • Substance-induced delirium
  • Substance-induced persisting dementia
  • Substance-induced persisting amnestic disorder
  • Substance-induced psychotic disorder
  • Substance-induced mood disorder
  • Substance-induced anxiety disorder
  • Hallucinogen persisting perceptual disorder
  • Substance-induced sexual dysfunction
  • Substance-induced sleep disorder

Substance/Medication–Induced Psychotic Disorder - Psychiatric Disorders - Merck Manuals Professional Edition

Substance-induced disorders are distinct from independent co-occurring mental disorders in that all or most of the psychiatric symptoms are the direct result of substance use.

This is not to state that substance-induced disorders preclude co-occurring mental disorders, only that the specific symptom cluster at a specific point in time is more likely the result of substance use, abuse, intoxication, or withdrawal than of underlying mental illness.

A client might even have both independent and substance-induced mental disorders. For example, a client may present with well-established independent and controlled bipolar disorder and alcohol dependence in remission, but the same client could be experiencing amphetamine-induced auditory hallucinations and paranoia from an amphetamine abuse relapse over the last 3 weeks.

Symptoms of substance-induced disorders run the gamut from mild anxiety and depression (these are the most common across all substances) to full-blown manic and other psychotic reactions (much less common). The “teeter-totter principle”—i.e., what goes up must come down—is useful to predict what kind of syndrome or symptoms might be caused by what substances.

For example, acute withdrawal symptoms from physiological depressants such as alcohol and benzodiazepines are hyperactivity, elevated blood pressure, agitation, and anxiety (i.e., the shakes). On the other hand, those who “crash” from stimulants are tired, withdrawn, and depressed. Virtually any substance taken in very large quantities over a long enough period can lead to a psychotic state.

Because clients vary greatly in how they respond to both intoxication and withdrawal given the same exposure to the same substance, and also because different substances may be taken at the same time, prediction of any particular substance-related syndrome has its limits.

What is most important is to continue to evaluate psychiatric symptoms and their relationship to abstinence or ongoing substance abuse over time. Most substance-induced symptoms begin to improve within hours or days after substance use has stopped.

Notable exceptions to this are psychotic symptoms caused by heavy and long-term amphetamine abuse and the dementia (problems with memory, concentration, and problem solving) caused by using substances directly toxic to the brain, which most commonly include alcohol, inhalants like gasoline, and again amphetamines.

Following is an overview of the most common classes of substances of abuse and the accompanying psychiatric symptoms seen in intoxication, withdrawal, or chronic use.

Alcohol

In most people, moderate to heavy consumption is associated with euphoria, mood lability, decreased impulse control, and increased social confidence (i.e., getting high). Such symptoms might even appear “hypomanic.” However these often are followed with next-day mild fatigue, nausea, and dysphoria (i.e., a hangover).

In a person who has many life stresses, losses, and struggles, which is often the case as addiction to alcohol proceeds, the mood lability and lowered impulse control can lead to increased rates of violence toward others and self.

Prolonged drinking increases the incidence of dysphoria, anxiety, and such violence potential. Symptoms of alcohol withdrawal include agitation, anxiety, tremor, malaise, hyperreflexia (exaggeration of reflexes), mild tachycardia (rapid heart beat), increasing blood pressure, sweating, insomnia, nausea or vomiting, and perceptual distortions.

Following acute withdrawal (a few days), some people will experience continued mood instability, fatigue, insomnia, reduced sexual interest, and hostility for weeks, so called “protracted withdrawal.” Differentiating protracted withdrawal from a major depression or anxiety disorder is often difficult.

More severe withdrawal is characterized by severe instability in vital signs, agitation, hallucinations, delusions, and often seizures. The best predictor of whether this type of withdrawal may happen again is if it happened before.

Alcohol-induced deliriums after high-dose drinking are characterized by fluctuating mental status, confusion, and disorientation and are reversible once both alcohol and its withdrawal symptoms are gone, while by definition, alcohol dementias are associated with brain damage and are not entirely reversible even with sobriety.

Caffeine

When consumed in large quantities, caffeine can cause mild to moderate anxiety, though the amount of caffeine that leads to anxiety varies. Caffeine is also associated with an increase in the number of panic attacks in individuals who are predisposed to them.

Cocaine and Amphetamines

Mild to moderate intoxication from cocaine, methamphetamine, or other stimulants is associated with euphoria, and a sense of internal well-being, and perceived increased powers of thought, strength, and accomplishment.

In fact, low to moderate doses of amphetamines may actually increase certain test-taking skills temporarily in those with attention deficit disorders (see this in appendix D) and even in people who do not have attention deficit disorders. However, as more substance is used and intoxication increases, attention, ability to concentrate, and function decrease.

With street cocaine and methamphetamines, dosing is almost always beyond the functional window. As dosage increases, the chances of impulsive dangerous behaviors, which may involve violence, promiscuous sexual activity, and others, also increases. Many who become chronic heavy users go on to experience temporary paranoid delusional states.

As mentioned above, with methamphetamines, these psychotic states may last for weeks, months, and even years. Unlike schizophrenic psychotic states, the client experiencing a paranoid state induced by cocaine more likely has intact abstract reasoning and linear thinking and the delusions are more likely paranoid and less bizarre (Mendoza and Miller 1992).

After intoxication comes a crash in which the person is desperately fatigued, depressed, and often craves more stimulant to relieve these withdrawal symptoms. This dynamic is why it is thought that people who abuse stimulants often go on week- or month-long binges and have a hard time stopping. At some point the ability of stimulants to push the person back into a high is lost (probably through washing out of neurotransmitters), and then a serious crash ensues.

Even with several weeks of abstinence, many people who are addicted to stimulants report a dysphoric state that is marked by anhedonia (absence of pleasure) and/or anxiety, but which may not meet the symptom severity criteria to qualify as DSM-IV Major Depression (Rounsaville et al. 1991).

These anhedonic states can persist for weeks. As mentioned above, heavy, long-term amphetamine use appears to cause long-term changes in the functional structure of the brain, and this is accompanied by long-term problems with concentration, memory, and, at times, psychotic symptoms.

Month-long methamphetamine binges followed by week- or month-long alcohol binges, a not uncommon pattern, might appear to be “bipolar” disorder if the drug use is not discovered. For more information, see the National Institute on Drug Abuse Web site (www.nida.nih.gov).

Hallucinogens

Hallucinogens produce visual distortions and frank hallucinations. Some people who use hallucinogens experience a marked distortion of their sense of time and feelings of depersonalization. Hallucinogens may also be associated with drug-induced panic, paranoia, and even delusional states in addition to the hallucinations.

Hallucinogen hallucinations usually are more visual (e.g., enhanced colors and shapes) as compared to schizophrenic-type hallucinations, which tend to be more auditory (e.g., voices). The existence of a marijuana-induced psychotic state has been debated (Gruber and Pope 1994), although a review of the research suggests that there is no such entity.

A few people who use hallucinogens experience chronic reactions, involving prolonged psychotic reactions, depression, exacerbations of preexisting mental disorders, and flashbacks. The latter are symptoms that occur after one or more psychedelic “trips” and consist of flashes of light and after-image prolongation in the periphery. The DSM-IV defines flashbacks as a “hallucinogen persisting perception disorder.” A diagnosis requires that they be distressing or impairing to the client (APA 1994, p. 234).

Nicotine

Clients who are dependent on nicotine are more likely to experience depression than people who are not addicted to it; however, it is unclear how much this is cause or effect. In some cases, the client may use nicotine to regulate mood.

Whether there is a causal relationship between nicotine use and the symptoms of depression remains to be seen. At present, it can be said that many persons who quit smoking do experience both craving and depressive symptoms to varying degrees, which are relieved by resumption of nicotine use (see chapter 8 for more information on nicotine dependence).

Opioids

Opioid intoxication is characterized by intense euphoria and well-being. Withdrawal results in agitation, severe body aches, gastrointestinal symptoms, dysphoria, and craving to use more opioids. Symptoms during withdrawal vary—some will become acutely anxious and agitated, while others will experience depression and anhedonia.

Even with abstinence, anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance can persist for weeks as a protracted withdrawal syndrome. Again, differentiating this from major depression or anxiety is difficult and many clinicians may just treat the ongoing symptom cluster.

For many people who become opioid dependent, and then try abstinence, these ongoing withdrawal symptoms are so powerful that relapse occurs even with the best of treatments and client motivation. For these clients, opioid replacement therapy (methadone, suboxone, etc.) becomes necessary and many times life saving.

There are reports of an atypical opioid withdrawal syndrome characterized by delirium after abrupt cessation of methadone (Levinson et al. 1995). Such clients do not appear to have the autonomic symptoms typically seen in opioid withdrawal. Long-term use of opioids is commonly associated with moderate to severe depression.

Phencyclidine (PCP) causes dissociative and delusional symptoms, and may lead to violent behavior and amnesia of the intoxication. Zukin and Zukin (1992) report that people who use PCP and who exhibit an acute psychotic state with PCP are more likely to experience another with repeated use.

Sedatives

Acute intoxication with sedatives like diazepam is similar to what is experienced with alcohol. Withdrawal symptoms are also similar to alcohol and include mood instability with anxiety and/or depression, sleep disturbance, autonomic hyperactivity, tremor, nausea or vomiting, and, in more severe cases, transient hallucinations or illusions and grand mal seizures.

There are reports of a protracted withdrawal syndrome characterized by anxiety, depression, paresthesias, perceptual distortions, muscle pain and twitching, tinnitus, dizziness, headache, derealization and depersonalization, and impaired concentration.

Most symptoms resolve within weeks, though some symptoms, such as anxiety, depression, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), and paresthesias (sensations such as prickling, burning, etc.), have been reported to last a year or more after withdrawal in rare cases.

No chronic dementia-type syndromes have been characterized with chronic use; however, many people who use sedatives chronically seem to experience difficulty with anxiety symptoms, which respond poorly to other anxiety treatments.

Diagnostic Considerations

Diagnoses of substance-induced mental disorders will typically be provisional and will require reevaluation—sometimes repeatedly. Many apparent acute mental disorders may really be substance-induced disorders, such as in those clients who use substances and who are acutely suicidal (see chapter 8 and appendix D for more on suicidality and drug use).

Some people who have what appear to be substance-induced disorders may turn out to have both a substance-induced disorder and an independent mental disorder. For most people who are addicted to substances, drugs eventually become more important than jobs, friends, family, and even children.

These changes in priorities often look, sound, and feel like a personality disorder, but diagnostic clarity regarding personality disorders in general is difficult, and in clients with substance-related disorders the true diagnostic picture might not emerge or reveal itself for weeks or months.

Moreover, it is not unusual for the symptoms of a personality disorder to clear with abstinence—sometimes even fairly early in recovery. Preexisting mood state, personal expectations, drug dosage, and environmental surroundings all warrant consideration in developing an understanding of how a particular client might experience a substance-induced disorder.

Treatment of the substance use disorder and an abstinent period of weeks or months may be required for a definitive diagnosis of an independent, co-occurring mental disorder.

As described in chapter 4 on assessment, substance abuse treatment programs and clinical staff can concentrate on screening for mental disorders and determining the severity and acuity of symptoms, along with an understanding of the client’s support network and overall life situation.

Criteria for Diagnosis of Substance-Induced Mood Disorders

1. A prominent and persistent disturbance in mood predominates, characterized by (a) a depressed mood or markedly diminished interest or pleasure in activities, or (b) an elevated, expansive, or irritable mood.

2. There is evidence from the history, physical examination, or laboratory findings that the symptoms developed during or within a month after substance intoxication or withdrawal, or medication use, is etiologically related to the mood disturbance

3. The disturbance is not better explained by a mood disorder.

4. The disturbance did not occur exclusively during a delirium.

5. The symptoms cause clinically significant distress or impairment.

Case Studies: Identifying Disorders

George M. is a 37-year-old divorced male who was brought into the emergency room intoxicated. His blood alcohol level was .152, and the toxicology screen was positive for cocaine. He was also suicidal (“I’m going to do it right this time!”).

He has a history of three psychiatric hospitalizations and two inpatient substance abuse treatments. Each psychiatric admission was preceded by substance use. George M. has never followed through with mental health care. He has intermittently attended Alcoholics Anonymous, but not recently.

Teresa G. is a 37-year-old divorced female who was brought into a detoxification unit 4 days ago with a blood alcohol level of .150. She is observed to be depressed, withdrawn, with little energy, fleeting suicidal thoughts, and poor concentration, but states she is just fine, not depressed, and life was good last week before her relapse. She has never used drugs (other than alcohol), and began drinking alcohol only 3 years ago.

However, she has had several alcohol-related problems since then. She has a history of three psychiatric hospitalizations for depression, at ages 19, 23, and 32. She reports a positive response to antidepressants. She is currently not receiving mental health services or substance abuse treatment. She is diagnosed with alcohol dependence (relapse) and substance-induced mood disorder, with a likely history of, but not active, major depression.

Discussion

Many factors must be examined when making initial diagnostic and treatment decisions. For example, if George M.’s psychiatric admissions were 2 or 3 days long, usually with discharges related to leaving against medical advice, decisions about diagnosis and treatment would be different (i.e., it is likely this is a substance-induced suicidal state and referral at discharge should be to a substance abuse treatment agency rather than a mental health center) than if two of his psychiatric admissions were 2 or 3 weeks long with clearly defined manic and psychotic symptoms continuing throughout the course, despite aggressive use of mental health care and medication (this is more likely a person with both bipolar disorder and alcohol dependence who requires integrated treatment for both his severe alcoholism and bipolar disorder).

Similarly, if Teresa G. had become increasingly depressed and withdrawn over the past 3 months, and had for a month experienced disordered sleep, poor concentration, and suicidal thoughts, she would be best diagnosed with major depression with an acute alcohol relapse rather than substance-induced mood disorder secondary to her alcohol relapse.

* further material uploading *

Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
RHODIUM GROUP

Die Hard – My Erection Saved My Life

By | GBH - DRUG INDUCED PSYCHOSIS
die-hard-my-erection-saved-my-life-joseph-de-saram-rhodium-linkedin

Die Hard – My Erection Saved My Life (±x)

Die Hard – My Erection Saved My Life (±x)
Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
619

Enter more text here

Whilst my adversaries call me a dick, I do ‘rise to the occasion’ during investigations so perhaps there is an element of truth – ha ha!

As I wrote in this article, EDS and PDS had turned up to Sri Lanka and started poisoning me, with a view to faking the symptoms of schizophrenia:-

Following on from other articles in the CHIS series:-

I recall from Monday 14 December 2015 I was incredibly unwell generally, but the astonishing thing was that my penis was erect all the time – in fact it was getting ridiculous in size and painful for hours.

It got to the point that Shihara the Owl Cat was trying to grab it through my shorts and I could not type on a keyboard as I had to have one hand free to stop his clawing!

Here is a video of how fast he can grab:-

All the while my parents were bringing alcohol and drinks and appeared to be putting in far too much effort to be nice – it is obvious when people do that and I know that Sri Lankans are only nice when they want something or when there is a hidden agenda.

The alcohol was apparently meant to cheer me up, but I was not depressed. However when I was drinking it I was feeling even worse generally and was having heart problems!

I just remembered that EDS was trying to push some drug on me, could not remember the name at the time, and forcing me to take it. I told him at the time that I would consider it after I checked the contraindications myself and spoken to Dr Stanley Amarasekera who was my Consultant Cardiologist, or words to that effect.

It is a well known fact that psychiatrists are obsessed in prescribing psychotropic medication, and it is a well known fact that any psychotropic medication will kill me because of my cardiovascular complications. EDS has serious psychological deficiencies at the best of time regrettably…

Psychotropic Drugs – ‘Makes Yer Cock Big’

The first thing I noticed was…

* * PRIAPISM * *

Soft Strong and Very Long – What is Priapism?

Symptoms

Priapism symptoms vary depending on the type of priapism. The two main types of priapism are ischemic and nonischemic priapism.

Priapism - Symptoms and causes

Learn more about services at Mayo Clinic.

Ischemic priapism

Ischemic priapism, also called low-flow priapism, is the result of blood not being able to leave the penis. It’s the more common type of priapism. Signs and symptoms include:

  • Erection lasting more than four hours or unrelated to sexual interest or stimulation
  • Rigid penile shaft, but the tip of penis (glans) is soft
  • Progressive penile pain

Recurrent or stuttering priapism, a form of ischemic priapism, is an uncommon condition. It’s more common in males who have an inherited disorder characterized by abnormally shaped red blood cells (sickle cell anemia). Sickle cells can block the blood vessels in the penis. Recurrent priapism describes repetitive episodes of prolonged erections and often includes episodes of ischemic priapism. In some cases, the condition starts off with unwanted and painful erections of short duration and might progress over time to more frequent and more prolonged erections.

Nonischemic priapism

Nonischemic priapism, also known as high-flow priapism, occurs when penile blood flow isn’t regulated appropriately. Nonischemic priapism is usually painless. Signs and symptoms include:

  • Erection lasting more than four hours or unrelated to sexual interest or stimulation
  • Erect but not fully rigid penile shaft

When to see a doctor

If you have an erection lasting more than four hours, you need emergency care. The emergency room doctor will determine whether you have ischemic priapism or nonischemic priapism. This is necessary because the treatment for each is different, and treatment for ischemic priapism needs to be done as soon as possible.

If you experience recurrent, persistent, painful erections that resolve on their own, see your doctor. You might need treatment to prevent further episodes.

Causes

An erection normally occurs in response to physical or psychological stimulation. This stimulation causes certain blood vessels and smooth muscles to relax and/or expand, increasing blood flow to spongy tissues in the penis. Consequently, the blood-filled penis becomes erect. After stimulation ends, the blood flows out and the penis returns to its nonrigid (flaccid) state.

Priapism occurs when some part of this system — the blood, blood vessels, smooth muscles or nerves — changes normal blood flow. Subsequently, the erection persists. While the underlying cause of priapism often can’t be determined, several conditions are believed to play a role.

Blood disorders

Blood-related diseases might contribute to priapism — usually ischemic priapism, when blood isn’t able to flow out of the penis. These disorders include:

  • Sickle cell anemia
  • Leukemia
  • Other hematologic dyscrasias, such as thalassemia, multiple myeloma and others

The most common associated diagnosis in children is sickle cell anemia.

Prescription medications

Priapism, usually ischemic priapism, is a possible side effect of a number of drugs, including:

  • Medications injected directly into the penis to treat erectile dysfunction, such as alprostadil, papaverine, phentolamine and others
  • Antidepressants, such as fluoxetine (Prozac), bupropion (Wellbutrin), and sertraline
  • Alpha blockers including prazosin, terazosin, doxazosin and tamsulosin
  • Medications used to treat anxiety or psychotic disorders, such as aripiprazole (Abilify), hydroxyzine, risperidone (Risperdal), olanzapine (Zyprexa), lithium, clozapine, chlorpromazine and thioridazine
  • Blood thinners, such as warfarin (Coumadin) and heparin
  • Hormones such as testosterone or gonadotropin-releasing hormone
  • Medications used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), such as methlyphenidate (Concerta)

All these four drugs would kill me because of my heart issues, and are OBVIOUSLY contraindicated:-

Alcohol and drug use

Alcohol, marijuana, cocaine and other illicit drug abuse can cause priapism, particularly ischemic priapism.

Injury

A common cause of nonischemic priapism — a persistent erection caused by excessive blood flow into the penis — is trauma or injury to your penis, pelvis or perineum, the region between the base of the penis and the anus.

Other factors

Other causes of priapism include:

  • A spider bite, scorpion sting or other toxic infections
  • Metabolic disorders including gout or amyloidosis
  • Neurogenic disorders, such as a spinal cord injury or syphilis
  • Cancers involving the penis

Complications

Ischemic priapism can cause serious complications. The blood trapped in the penis is deprived of oxygen. When an erection lasts for too long, this oxygen-poor blood can begin to damage or destroy tissues in the penis. As a result, untreated priapism can cause erectile dysfunction.

High Dosage of Aripiprazole Induced Priapism: A Case Report | CNS Spectrums | Cambridge Core

High Dosage of Aripiprazole Induced Priapism: A Case Report - Volume 16 Issue 8 - Wen-Yu Hsu, Nan-Ying Chiu, Chieh-Hui Wang, Cheng-Yeh Lin...
Cambridge Core

Recurrent priapism associated with use of aripiprazole. - PubMed - NCBI

J Clin Psychiatry. 2006 Sep;67(9):1471-2. Case Reports; Comment; Letter

Priapism Associated with Multiple Psychotropics: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5248413/

What’s Pink and Hard? – A Pig with a Flick Knife

BUT WHAT’S BROWN AND HARD? – JOE DE SARAM 🙂

As soon as I realised that I was suffering from priapism, I knew that I had been poisoned with psychotropic medication.

THANK GOD I PASSED PHARMACOLOGY AT UCL MEDICAL SCHOOL!

That fact also explained all the other symptoms as well – which were rapid onset.

THESE ARE THE SIDE-EFFECTS THAT ARE RARE, BUT I SUFFERED THE MAJORITY OF THESE PROBLEMS AND THEY ARE EXTREMELY DANGEROUS. I DON’T KNOW HOW I SURVIVED…

  1. I WAS ACTUALLY HAVING SEIZURES LIKE AN EPILEPTIC PATIENT
  2. MY MUSCLES WERE BECOMING WEAK AND I RAPIDLY BEGAN TO LOSE MUSCLE MASS FROM MY ARMS. I STRUGGLED TO CARRY DESKTOP PCS FROM ROOM TO ROOM
  3. MY UNSTABLE ANGINA WAS GETTING UNBEARABLE, AND I WAS IN TEARS AFTER EDS/PDS HAD GONE TO THEIR HOTEL
  4. I SUFFERED TWO CARDIAC ARRESTS – MY HEART TENDS TO START UP ON ITS OWN AFTER AROUND TEN SECONDS, BUT THIS IS NOT FUNNY
  5. I WAS GETTING TRANSIENT ISCHAEMIC ATTACKS THREE TIMES A DAY, AND STAGGERING AROUND LIKE A DRUNKARD IN MY HOUSE
  6. I WAS HAVING SPASMS IN MY NECK AND THE QUALITY OF MY SPEECH DETERIORATED TO THE POINT OF EMBARRASSING
  7. CLUMPS OF HAIR STARTED FALLING OUT OF MY HEAD DURING MY SHOWERS
  8. I WAS SWEATING PROFUSELY AND WANTED WATER BUT EDS WAS TELLING ME THAT I WAS DRINKING TOO MUCH WATER, EVEN THOUGH I WAS NOT AT ALL, LESS THAN 3 LITRES PER DAY.
  9. MY ARMS AND FACE WERE TWITCHING UNCONTROLLABLY
  10. I WAS STRUGGLING WITH THE LEGAL CASES THAT I WAS WORKING ON AND MY MEMORY WHICH IS PHENOMENAL SUDDENLY BECAME ABYSMAL. MY INCISIVE JUDGEMENT WAS COMPLETELY COMPROMISED.

I COULD HAVE EASILY DIED ANY TIME. THESE EFFECTS STARTED ON MONDAY AND BY THURSDAY I WAS ASSAULTED, KIDNAPPED AND UNLAWFULLY IMPRISONED BY EDS/PDS!

Offences Against the Person Act 1861

Maliciously administering poison, &c. so as to endanger life or inflict grievous bodily harm.

Whosoever shall unlawfully and maliciously administer to or cause to be administered to or taken by any other person any poison or other destructive or noxious thing, so as thereby to endanger the life of such person, or so as thereby to inflict upon such person any grievous bodily harm, shall be guilty of felony, and being convicted thereof shall be liable . . . to be kept in penal servitude for any term not exceeding ten years . . . 

Given the fact that I could have died at any point, I am writing the case as Attempted Murder rather than Grievous Bodily Harm with Intent…

The Solution

I had to immediately stop drinking the milk drinks that EDS/PDS brought me, the water I had to reduce considerably (even though I was suddenly thirsty and could not swallow) and I had to stop the alcohol IMMEDIATELY.

‘Don’t you trust us?’ is what their usual reply was but frankly NO I DID NOT!

I needed to eat any food that they brought with a massive amount of caution, and only eat what they were eating. Me ending up on a diet also restricted the intake of poison which also saved me because psychotropic medication causes increases in appetite as well as raised blood-glucose.

Also, I was having postural hypotension suddenly, in which whenever I stood up from a seated position, I my heart would hurt and I would almost collapse in a spell of dizziness.

It was like I had AGED 30 YRS FROM THAT MONDAY

The postural hypotension was also triggered by Chamaree Silva using something like Rohypnol on 22 October 2015, which also caused me to suffer a cardiac arrest and fall in the road, until my heart suddenly restarted, and I did not hit my head like the previous time.

I was confused all the time and was severly depressed – all these are the symptoms of Abilify being administered unlawfully by EDS but that was extremely foolish and dangerous to give me that drug for reasons obvious enough.

EDS kept telling me to drink less water, but I was not drinking more than about 2.5 litres per day – that is not even half the danger level of 6 litres. Even that was irritating me and I wondered why he could not see that I was sweating buckets and my blood pressure was very low all of a sudden.

What should I avoid while taking Abilify?

This medication may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Dizziness or severe drowsiness can cause falls, fractures, or other injuries.

Avoid drinking alcohol. Dangerous side effects could occur.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated. Drink plenty of fluids, especially in hot weather and during exercise. It is easier to become dangerously overheated and dehydrated while you are taking Abilify.

Abilify side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Abilify: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

I SUFFERED THE HIGHLIGHTED ITEMS AT THE HAND OF EDS AND PDS

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • severe agitation, distress, or restless feeling;
  • twitching or uncontrollable movements of your eyes, lips, tongue, face, arms, or legs;
  • mask-like appearance of the face, trouble swallowing, problems with speech;
  • seizure (convulsions);
  • thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself;
  • severe nervous system reaction–very stiff (rigid) muscles, high fever, sweating, confusion, fast or uneven heartbeats, tremors, feeling like you might pass out;
  • low blood cell counts–sudden weakness or ill feeling, fever, chills, sore throat, swollen gums, painful mouth sores, red or swollen gums, skin sores, cold or flu symptoms, cough, trouble breathing; or
  • high blood sugar–increased thirst, increased urination, hunger, dry mouth, fruity breath odor, drowsiness, dry skin, weight loss.

You may have increased sexual urges, unusual urges to gamble, or other intense urges while taking this medicine. Talk with your doctor if this occurs.

I SUFFERED THE HIGHLIGHTED ITEMS AT THE HAND OF EDS AND PDS

Common Abilify side effects may include:

weight gain;

blurred vision;

nausea, vomiting, changes in appetite, constipation;

drooling;

headache, dizziness, drowsiness, feeling tired;

anxiety, feeling restless;

sleep problems (insomnia); or

  • cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat.

Abilify: Uses, Dosage & Side Effects - Drugs.com

Abilify is an antipsychotic medicine used to treat the symptoms of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Learn about side effects, interactions and indications.

In a Nutshell

EDS poisoned me with an anti-psychotic, which then produced schizophrenia-type symptoms. He then described those self-generated symptoms to third parties, to take away my human rights via attempts at unlawful sectioning, and to cause grievous bodily harm and/or attempted murder!!

I WAS UNLAWFULLY SUBJECTED TO COMPLETELY EXTRAJUDICIAL PROCESSES THROUGHOUT!!

However thanks using my erection as a YARDSTICK (literally!), I was half expecting something imminently. Since EDS was flying back to the UK, I knew that I would suffer grievous bodily harm during that week itself. I was mentally prepared for a hostile situation as I knew one was coming.

THESE FOOLS COULD NOT DISTINGUISH PERCEPTION V PARANOIA!

And I was right of course, and actually when it came I was ready to fight it:-

And these fraudsters were going around telling everyone that I had no insight – well they had not counted on King Dong, well I was for about a week at least 🙂

The case continues…

Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
RHODIUM GROUP