DSM-5 – What are Hallucinations?

By 20 February 2019DSM-5

DSM-5 - What are Hallucinations?

Published on 7th August 2018
Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
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Joseph de Saram discusses Hallucinations, perceptions in the absence of external stimulus that has qualities of real perception. Hallucinations are vivid, substantial, and are perceiv+ed to be located in external objective space. They are distinguishable from several related phenomena, such as dreaming, which does not involve wakefulness; pseudohallucination, which does not mimic real perception, and is accurately perceived as unreal; illusion, which involv4es distorted or misinterpreted real perception; and imagery, which does not mimic real perception and is under voluntary control.[1]

“Hallucinations are perception-like experiences that occur without an external stimulus. They are vivid and clear, with the full force and impact of normal perceptions, and not under voluntary control. They may occur in any sensory modality, but auditory hallucinations are the most common in schizophrenia and related disorders.” – DSM-5

* * OBVIOUSLY IT IS NOT A HALLUCINATION IF THERE IS VOLUMINOUS FORENSIC EVIDENCE RELATING TO THE 12/17 FRAUD, WHICH CAN BE ANALYSED 650 DAYS AFTERWARDS 🙂 * *

Medical Definition of Hallucination

Hallucination: A profound distortion in a person’s perception of reality, typically accompanied by a powerful sense of reality. An hallucination may be a sensory experience in which a person can see, hear, smell, taste, or feel something that is not there.

The types of hallucinations include:

  • An Auditory hallucination is an hallucination involving the sense of hearing. Called also paracusia and paracusis.
  • A Gustatory hallucination is an hallucination involving the sense of taste.
  • A hypnagogic hallucination is a vivid dreamlike hallucination at the onset of sleep.
  • Kinesthetic hallucination is an hallucination involving the sense of bodily movement.
  • Lilliputian hallucination is an hallucination in which things, people, or animals seem smaller than they would be in reality.
  • Olfactory hallucination is an hallucination involving the sense of smell.
  • Somatic hallucination is an hallucination involving the perception of a physical experience occurring with the body.
  • Tactile hallucination is an hallucination involving the sense of touch.
  • Visual hallucination is an hallucination involving the sense of sight.

What Are Hallucinations?

If you're like most folks, you probably think hallucinations have to do with seeing things that aren't really there. But there's a lot more to it than that. It could mean you touch or even smell something that doesn't exist ...

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Edward de Saram has a History of Drug-Induced Hallucination

Drug-Induced Formication: How it Happens and How to Make it Stop Formication is the sensation as if something is crawling in your skin. Believe it or not, it is a common phenomenon for many people who use stimulant drugs. How does it happen? Is there a way to prevent it? This article highlights what drug-induced formication is and how to make it stop ...

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Drug-Induced Psychosis - 25i-NBOMe as used in Political Psychiatry

As I have recovered more forensic evidence I have been able to make a number of enhancements to previous theories ...

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Substance-Induced Mental Disorders

As I wrote in the following article, Edward de Saram obtained and poisoned me with psychotropic medication that ‘conveniently’ fabricated schizophrenia-type symptoms ...

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Drug-Induced Formication

Drug-Induced Formication: How it Happens and How to Make it Stop Formication is the sensation as if something is crawling in your skin. Believe it or not, it is a common phenomenon for many people who use stimulant drugs. How does it happen? Is there a way to prevent it? This article highlights what drug-induced formication is and how to make it stop ...

“Auditory hallucinations are usually experienced as voices, whether familiar or unfamiliar, that are perceived as distinct from the individual’s own thoughts. The hallucinations must occur in the context of a clear sensorium; those that occur while falling asleep (hypnagogic) or waking up (hypnopompic) are considered to be within the range of normal experience. Hallucinations may be a normal part of religious experience in certain cultural contexts.” – DSM-5

Auditory and Visual Hallucinations - Definitely Schizophrenia

Auditory ‘Hallucinations’ according to EDS The Fraud Psychiatrist The ‘hallucinations’ are actually forensic evidence which confirms cellular interception, UK News of the World Style 🙂 ...

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Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
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